Testimonials

Kathy Kupka
Kathy Kupka Sister, Kristine Kupka, is Missing

I am Kathy Kupka and Gil Alba is my private investigator. I could have told you over 5 years ago that he deserved to be investigator of the year because he saved my life.

My sister, Kristine Kupka, disappeared in October of 1998. The police did nothing and I didn’t know what to do…then in stepped Gil. From that time on, he has never given up, never forgotten Kristine, always followed up on every lead, respected my loss, always acted positively and has always been optimistic that one day we would find Kristine.

Gil’s skills never cease to amaze me. He is a master when it comes to talking to people, taking the time to get them to answer the questions he needs without them even knowing it. He is ingenious when it comes to getting around road blocks. He doesn’t stop, but instead is able to figure out then take another approach to get to the information he needs. He always has a grand plan and the big picture in his mind and I trust him implicitly.

During the time he was a detective in the NYPD, the people he helped didn’t even know how lucky they were. My experience with the NYPD was horrible and he has restored my faith that there are competent, caring, brilliant detectives out there to help others. He has done far more than the police in my sister’s case. Often times, he has shared important information with them or done work they should have done.

I am so lucky to be writing this testimonial because I am so lucky to have Gil.

Sincerely,

Kathy Kupka

Michael Diaz
Michael Diaz NYPD Detective

It gives me great pleasure to discuss an individual that by far and whole heartedly is a unique human being. As for me I’m Michael Diaz, a retired detective second grader, twenty year member of the New York City Police Department.  I have worked in some of the most elite units in the police department through out my twenty year illustrious career. I’ve been involved in over 1000 police arrest cases and have received numerous awards and citations including the medal of Valor. I am formerly the 1996 Police American Gladiator show champion.  I was featured on the Americas Heroes ESPN football special after The World Trade Center bombing.  All of this seems to be impressive but in 1991 is when it all started happening for me.  I met an older gentleman by the name of Gil Alba.  He was a first grade detective who was a great source of knowledge.  Immediately he took me under his wing.  I was a third grade detective at the time.  He constantly led me in the right path to a great future always reminding me never to forget where I came from.  With his leadership and guidance he became my mentor, a brother ,a friend ,and sometimes a father figure.  With his guidance and perseverance we became one of the best detective duos while we were assigned to the Joint Robbery Apprehension Team an NYPD-FBI Task Force.  Solving over sixty home invasion robbery cases and working some of the most complex kidnapping cases.  One in particular that will go down in New York history is the Harvey Weinstein kidnapping.  Gil Alba’s tenacious way of approaching a case was like a fever that would spread among his peers.  I definitely caught on to this and within two years of working with him I was promoted to second grade detective.  In addition to work related situations he was able to guide me through some difficult times in my personal life.  We became somewhat a family. Many years later Gil and I are still best of friends.  Police life has taken a back step now that I am a school teacher.  One of my specialties is to bring in a guest speaker, that being Gil Alba to hopefully do for others what he has done for me.  Staying focused with work and family is a lot simpler when you have a Gil Alba involved in your life.

This Testimonial is for Gil Alba a special person who with no doubt in my mind possesses the strength and determination that has been gathered.

Cheryl Gassler Mother

My name is Cheryl Gassler from Bangor, PA and I am writing this on behalf of Mr. Gil Alba. Mr. Alba was contacted in April of 2003 by our lawyer who could no longer help us in locating our missing 19yr. old son.

We met with Mr. Alba and told him our story of how our son never returned to his apartment after visiting home on April 3, 2003. He left no notes, told nobody anything (he had 2 roommates), just disappeared. Mr. Alba said he usually didn’t do these kind of searches, but something pulled him towards this case and he said he would do it.

We had a clue to go on through our son’s cell phone that he was somewhere in Canada. Mr. Alba went there and a very short time gave us some good news that he had found him safe and well, but needed some time before talking to us. Mr. Alba encouraged our son to call us even if he didn’t want to come home, just so we knew he was ok. It was a few days after Mr. Alba had returned home that we heard from our son and that he wanted to come home.

If not for Mr. Alba, our son might have taken a different way out and our story wouldn’t be a happy one. But it did turn for the best and Mr. Alba deserves more than any award you could give him. Words alone can’t say enough or how I feel about him and what he did for us.

Marie Cilento Sister

My name is Marie Cilento.  I met Mr. Alba in June 2003, when I brought to him, what I believed to be unusual circumstances surrounding the death of my brother, James Accardi.  Not only was Mr. Alba compassionate and understanding, but, more importantly, he believed in me and the fact that there was more to my brother’s death then the NYS Police were willing to see.  To this day, the NYS Police still feel nothing out of the ordinary took place.

Mr. Alba interviewed many, many individuals; uncovering more than the naked eye could have possibly seen.  Uncovering more than the local authorities were ever willing to find.  Enough, in fact, that without proof positive, we were able to bring Mr. Alba’s findings to the Dutchess County District Attorney’s Office, and have them continue the case. Although the case has been closed with the NYS Police, it is still open with Mr. Alba and the District Attorney’s Office.

Our family will be eternally thankful to Gil Alba for listening when all we wanted was to be heard.  For allowing our family some piece of mind, when we thought we’d lost our minds. There isn’t a doubt in my mind, and heart, Mr. Gil Alba deserves more than the “Investigator Of The Year” award.

Ed Petersen Buckley Petersen Global

l have had the pleasure and honor to have worked with Gil Alba in both my capacity as an FBI Agent of 27 years and as a private investigator/consultant for the past 3 years. He is an individual of high moral character, integrity, an excellent investigator and a true professional.

Gil has great sensitivity in dealing with others. He is respectful, caring and dedicated in his pursuit of the truth. He is always well prepared, relentless in his questioning and quick to spot deception. I think what makes him unique is his determination to go after the tough cases, the cases that most investigators would look to avoid. He enjoys a challenge and is quick to come to the aid of the underdog, which is an admirable and commendable trait. He is loyal, committed to his work, and a trusted friend.

In my opinion, the Association of Licensed Detectives for the State of New York could not have made a better or more deserving choice for “Investigator of the Year” than Gil Alba. I wish him all the very best and look forward to working with him for many years to come.

Ross Glatzer
Ross Glatzer CEO, OneCARE

I want to commend the Association of Licensed Detectives (NY State) on the selection of Gil Alba for Investigator of the Year, 2003. After retiring as CEO of Prodigy Services Company, I had the pleasure of working as a volunteer with Gil on the Larry Andrews, missing person case, in 1998. Gil “drafted” me to be a part of a team that he put together to conduct a comprehensive search for the missing boy whose body was eventually found. It was clear to me then that Gil was a very organized, professional and driven investigator who went well beyond normal business borders to do what was necessary, working around the clock to help find the family’s missing son.

When the Larry Andrew case was concluded, Gil pulled together all the information associated with the development and administration of how to conduct a large-scale search for a missing person and developed a web site called Iammissing.com. The site was live for several years and was frequently accessed by numerous people around the world.

I also have some familiarity with the Kristine Kupka case and have watched Gil spend countless months and years working to assemble all the pieces to the puzzle in order to bring finality to this ongoing investigation. He, along with Kathy Kupka, has refused to let the investigation languish and he has done what was necessary, often at his own expense, to continue the search and pull together all the piece-parts that will ultimately result in the conviction of the killer.

Gil Alba is the kind of person that any family in need would want to call on for help. He exudes professionalism and is relentless to the task. The Association of Licensed Detectives has clearly bestowed their award on the right person.

Mark Christopher Reverend

It is, indeed, a genuine honor to offer this testimonial in behalf of Gil Alba who will be recognized as “Investigator of the Year” later this year.

I feel like a dim voice from his distant past recalling my impressions of a young man about to ride out the rite of passage from adolescence to adulthood. .  But acorns drop and grow near the grand  trees  into which they will eventually  grow… those who have loved them and those who taught them.   I sincerely believe, with the usual  few exceptions,  that living with a person for four years, twenty-four  hours a day, ten  months a year   does impart a better  understanding  and truer picture of  what to expect from a boy growing into his manhood.

St.  Francis  was and still is a private Catholic  high school which at one time admitted resident students  primarily from the northeast United States.  During Gil’s four year  sojourn,  I, a Catholic priest, taught him in the classroom and, more importantly, supervised  him as his  guardian in all his after school activities. In effect, I was mother and father to him which gave me thorough insight as to who Gil was and was hoping to be.

St. Francis High School, located just outside Buffalo, New York, provided a situation completely different from the environments in which he was reared:  Puerto Rico and New York City.   But it was as a son in an   immigrant family that, he and his brother Louis were nurtured and cared for, tenderly and rightly by a proud, sacrificing mother in a single parent home.

It was his mother who who dreamed that her sons must receive a quality education, one that was academically challenging and yet, enabling enough to allow them to develop their natural but latent athletic abilities.

Honesty, perseverance, tolerance and sensitivity, the vital traits that bind every Investigator worthy of his vocation  must be acquired  early in life if the investigator is to  measure up to the standards of his calling.  Later enhanced by his academy training and  college rigors, together with the moral values instilled  in his home and school,  Gil’s qualifications are now recognized and stamped as outstanding,  exemplary and  worthy of emulation by other budding investigators and officers.

Gil was an average student; a developing athlete, able to blend, quietly and efficiently, all the above qualities into a remarkably successful career.    Of course, he never dreamed that one day he would be on stage to receive these   accolades,  but, those of us who watched him grow and think and judge knew that he would be a success in whatever career  he would choose. 

Immigrant families still travel a long and rough road as they did in the fifties and sixties.  Gil hardly complained, sought no special considerations, yet graciously and proudly carried his great devotion for his mother who spared no effort to guide him.  The honors and the respect he enjoys today are simply the results of his living up to her  moral values and expectations.

During a recent visit to New York City, we met, lunched and spent several hours happily reviewing the days of his “‘boyhood splendors.”    A grateful person eventually learns to revere the events and people of his past who helped shape his personhood.  To this point, Gil stated very casually that a life turning point occurred in his sophomore English class which was covering Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar.”  To me it was a course requisite.  To him, it opened vistas he never knew existed.  Since, he has acquired a modest collection of Shakespearean volumes, but more importantly it demonstrates that there are no nooks and crannies in life that should be explored. This fascination with the  the poet opened the door, I believe,  to his fascination for  the life and work of an Investigator whose life is a science of always noticing the less obvious…

 Mindful of his humble beginnings, grateful for the family inspirations, aware of the diligence he will always need to help those who knock on his door,  Gil Alba’s success comes as no surprise. He was a fine boy.  He is a finer man. Would that his profession abound with people as honest, compassionate, just and understanding.  We need more Gil Alba’s in the world today.

Ivan & Karla Belloto & Family
Ivan & Karla Belloto & Family Camp Owners

Some 20 years ago, I first met Gil Alba.  It was an immediate pleasure.  Tall, good looking, sweetly friendly – just a charming fellow, and so he has remained.  Our friendship blossomed and grew.  Indeed, this friendship has never stopped growing.

In my present family challenges, is he extremely helpful, ever understanding, creatively patient and powerfully strong.  His intuition has an immediate apprehension.  To the challenges that almost destroyed our family, Gil, with stupendous determination and endless love, brought us to resolution and unity.  He is always ready to help.

Amazingly, he has the intelligence of swiftly attaining direct knowledge.  Quick, thorough, and ready insight is another forte of Gil’s.

Over many years, Gil has helped develop security strength in our camp staff of 200.  Aiding all in finding easier, simpler, safer and more effective security ways; always updating.

As Camp Kiwi’s security director of 800 campers, he has constantly achieved cooperative fair compromises; nicely designing democratic approaches to solutions resulting in solid staff goals.

His friendly, calm, humorous style brings involved unity, easily progressing to greater satisfaction.  Our large coordinating staffs adore and highly respect him.

To fear, he brings courage.  To darkness, he brings enlightment.  To dishonesty, he brings honesty.  To laissez-faire, he brings sustained caring involvement.  To disrespect, he brings respect.  To misunderstanding, he brings understandingness.  To complication, he brings simplicity.  To confusion, he brings organization.  To weakness he brings strength.  To anger, he brings peace.  To dishonor he brings honor.  To destruction, he brings construction.  To ugliness, he brings beauty.  He cares deeply in a most meaningful way!

Gil is a most unique and delightful human being.  Indeed, I wish he were my brother!

Sheila Weller

One evening in late fall 1998 I — a journalist and author, on the trail of a powerful story about a very likable young New York woman who disappeared without a trace –was sitting with assembled volunteers in a Brooklyn brownstone, waiting for the guest of honor to show. The guest of honor was The Expert — a professional in finding vanished and victimized people, and he was going to teach them all how to do their volunteer canvasing, poster-distributing and amateur search. He was Gil Alba, a detective who specialized in missing young people; he had recently led the (ultimately tragic) search for a young male student who hailed from Gil’s own upper-Westchester or Putnam County region. Gil had heard about Kristine Kupka’s disappearance and had driven all the way down  the twisty Saw Mill Parkway to Brooklyn, to help Kupka’s family organize volunteers to help find her.

“Who are you? A reporter, huh? I don’t know if I want you in this room while I talk to them,” Gil loudly launched in at me, as I hunched, scribbling notes, the proverbial fly on the wall. His in-your-face gruffness (something I would soon learn to appreciate as a method of getting people to cough up the beans right away) and singling-out of me (damn!, I was trying to suck up to this family!) intimidated, annoyed, intrigued, and impressed me, all at once. I squeeked. in a schoolgirl octave: “I’m a contributing editor for New York magazine; oh, please, let me stay! I won’t tell anybody what happens in this room!”: now sucking up to this large, gruff ex-cop as well as to the assembled friends of Kristine.

Gil let me stay.

Phew.

Later, of course, I would see that Gil’s tell-it-as-he-sees-it verbal style and his macho was, aside from a good diagnostic tool, both the essence of his pull-no-punches honesty and the cover for a very kindly heart.

Gil has been doggedly on the case of Kristine Kupka’s disappearance — and, I think it can be safe to assume: murder — all these years. He has never given up. He is heroic for this. I don’t know if I ever told Gil, in my 5+ years of knowing him, that one of the reasons I became a writer specializing in crime (I’m attaching my career bio)  is that my own cousin, Ellen Jane Hover,  23, disappeared from New York in 1976, and the detective on that case was an impassioned sleuth who never gave up*, working it for years with no money. In my years of knowing Gil, with his passionate dedication to the Kupka case and others, he is in this same hero-detective mold, in the process educating countless citizens and friends and relatives of crime victims on how to find their loved ones and get information, closure, and justice.

Anyway, after his gruff “who are you?” in Kathy Kupka’s apartment that night, Gil and I bonded. He came with me on some of my investigative rounds for the story, amplifying my writerly timidity in approaching people with his macho-cop shtick. Without him, I never could have gotten the story. We were a great team, and my story broke news when it appeared on New York magazine’s cover 8 weeks later.

I then left the story, but Gil has never left it. Over the years every time I called him he would be that much closer to finding out what happened to Kristine. The loyalty, that doggedness, that refusal to give up on a dead woman, or her grieving and mystified family: in a city and a world that demands instant results and instant payoffs, this is the definition of character to me.

A few months passed from Kupka’s disappearance. In February 1999 the story that came to rivet New York was the appalling shooting death of African immigrant Amadou Diallo — the hard-working young man with the sweet smile — in a hail of 41 bullets in front of his house in the Soundview section of the Bronx by 4 New York City Street Crime Unit Cops. The entire, immense liberal world of New York — every latte-sipper and quite a few instant-Maxwell-House drinkers as well — went (you should pardon the expression) ballistic at Mayor Giuliani for what we heard and felt was his no-holds-barred encouragement of the Street Crime Unit to engage in tactics that not only denied African Americans their civil liberties and assumed that black men in this city were criminals until proven otherwise…but that had fostered the hair-trigger-ness that cost Diallo his life. (Of course two and a half years later those same people who hated Giuiliani would see him as their, and New York’s, and the country’s, hero. But that, as we all know, is another story — THE story of our time.)

And everyone in the Manhattan chattering classes hated those four Street Crime cops.

Well, everyone but me.

I had befriended many a policeman through the course of writing four true crime accounts of high-profile crimes in ten years. When I wrote about the murder of Harpers magazine assistant Diane Pikul by her wealthy Wall St. stock analyst (and cross-dressing,violent AIDS-afflicted alcoholic) husband Joe Pikul, I became friends with everyone from the fabulous Bill Glynn (more oike Jerry Orbach;s character on Law and Order than Orbach;s character himself), who has solved so many NY homicides and taken so many violent killers off the street, and with Don Delaney, Long Island-based NY State Trooper honcho (and now cybercrime expert) extraordinaire. When I did my book on (and, er, with) Amy Fisher, the great men of Nassau County homicide — Dan Severin and Marty Alger — did me the great favor of talking (and talking, and talking…! wow!) to only one reporter: me. (I also got to know terrific p.i. Richie Haeg. (Richie: Call me!)  During my book on the O.J. Simpson case, my long, confidential conversations with former LAPD officer Ron Shipp, a truly principled and courageous man, gave the prosecution one of its key witnesses (and terrified the defense, enough that they made Shipp a punching bag to scare off any of Simpson’s other friends who might also think of spilling key beans). Finding the 5 secret rape or attempted-rape victims of Alex Kelly for my next book, I relied on a dynamite former Darien, CT cop (did she ever roll her eyes up at those drunk little rich kids) and, now, criminology professor, Rebecca Hahn Nathanson.

So, since cops were my heroes, I had gazed at the lineup of the Diallo cops…and when my eyes came to Richard Murphy, who had had an impeccable record (zero civilian complaints or killings) and also wore a Jewish star (for his wife;s religion) along with a cross around his neck, I decided to stick my own neck out and do a New York magazine profile on Murphy as…a good guy who was caught up in a system run amok.

“Hey wait a minute, Sheila! You like the guy just because he wears a Jewish star? — that doesn’t make sense!” There was Gil on the phone, trying to put a little stuffing in my impetuous naivete.

Gil was a total guide, partner, listening post, compass, chaperone, and educator during my months on the Murphy story for New York. Oh, did we shlep!: out to Long Island to try to get Murphy’s high school yearbook (getting high school year books, as all you investigators know, is like trying to get Pentagon files). Up to the Bronx, to the Diallo crime scene, for what seemed like hours: looking at every bullet hole, Gil helping me try to run the tragic shooting down. He was a better reporter than I was, teaching me the reporter’s lesson: Throw away your preconceived notions. Dare to find out what might kill your story. Keep an open mind. And to an upper Manhattan coffee shop where a friend of Gil’s who he’d talked into meeting with me sat down, and told me the real-deal story of the Street Crime Unit. Because he had been a part of it for years. We looked over all the documents, the police reports, the profiles, and I listened to those two pro’s talk. Though I had talked to many cops over my career, this was like being at Cop Harvard. By the time I got up from that leatherette booth I knew what had happened that fateful night, and which one of the four cops (not my guy Murphy) had been “the problem.” It never came out at the trial but I think the theory (which of course I never committed to paper) was a sound one.

My story, “The Shooter,” came out in New York magazine in December ’99, just as the Diallo-cop trial was starting. The story was praised for its open-mindedness and humanity. I couldn’t have done it without Gil, who underneath his toughness and his bluntness, taught me a lot about open-mindedness and humanity, and who, in a way that isn’t obvious when you meet him, identifies with ethnic minorities and eschews and was deeply offended by the kind of profiling that was at the heart of the Diallo tragedy.

Over the subsequent three years I would call Gil whenever I had a story that I needed a strong P.I. p.o.v. on — or when I needed to talk out a hypothetical. Okay: Whenever I needed a favor. And favors I asked him and favors he did. To my thank-you-thank-you!s and my flailing offers to write a brochure for him, then, and now he always said the same thing:

“Sheila, don’t keep saying you’ll do something for me. You owe me nothing.”

That’s my definition of a mensch.

Gil is always there to shoot down a wild but genuinely-bandied-about theory — as when, just a month ago, some p.i. professionals in a shall-go-nameless state honestly believed that a beloved, mild-mannered female cultural icon had something to do with her husband’s drug-overdose-death. He’s always there for advice. For help. But mostly he helps others — a whole country-full of desperate family members who have no other allies in the thankless search for their missing loved ones, searches their local police departments cannot or will not or will no longer do, because it’s been years since the loss. Gil has gone around the country giving workshops, meeting and helping these people, and helping other p.i.’s learn how to do what he has been doing on the Kupka case for all these years: Never give up. A human being is missing — someone’s child. Never give up, for them. For the sake of them. Never give up, like the NY detective (now deceased) did for my cousin Ellen.

Gil, you richly deserve this honor, and I am proud of you for it, proud to be your friend, and proud to have my testimonial included in the ceremony.

Just one more thing, because Gil will no doubt be too modest to tell you this: Last year in the wittier-than-thou — and read-by-everyone-who’s-everyone-in-New-York NY Times column “Boldfaced Names” — a chronicle of the rich, the cultured, the famous, the accomplished, and the bullshit artists of Gotham: Gil (not Brad Pitt, not Michael Blooomberg, not Henry Kravis, not Graydon Carter, not Sean P. Diddy Combs) — our Gil — was cited for his sartorial wardrobe.

Take that, all you snooty out there who still use the term “gumshoe.”

Ellen’s bones were found a year later in a wooded area of Rockland County. Her killer, a photographer with a record for rape named Rodney Alcala, was never prosecuted for her murder, and in that inability to prosecute him he drove across the country and went on to kill a 12 year old girl, Robin Samsoe, for whose capital murder he was, after a mistrial, finally convicted. Two and a half decades later, Alcala remains one of the most notorious and despicably-bogus-appeals-filing inmates on California’s Death Row.

Frustrated by the lack of support provided by the police and political leaders and desperate to find their son, the Andrews family took matters into their own hands and hired Gil Alba, Private Investigator. The missing persons case involved Larry Andrews Jr, M/W/22, who disappeared on New Years Eve, 1998, in New York City, Times Square. The Andrews family formed a tight bond with Alba, which in turn, enabled them to galvanize a community and conduct a tightly organized search for the missing boy.

Gil Alba, in concert with the Andrews family, recruited over 300 volunteers that distributed over 350,000 flyers, interviewed thousands of people, set up a hotline that received over 150 sightings, followed up on each sighting as well as organized political rallies and fund raisers. Forty-three days later his body was discovered in the waterways off of Brooklyn Pier. Gil Alba helped to create a lasting web site that archived all the knowledge and information gained during the search for Larry Andrews which in turn could be used by other families who may be faced with the same dilemma of how to search for a loved one.

Doctor Michael Brescia
Doctor Michael Brescia Senior Vice-President / Executive Medical Director

I am the Executive Medical Director of Calvary Hospital, a 200-bed hospital located in Bronx, NY, which provides palliative care to adult patients who sutTer from advanced cancer and its terrible symptoms. We have constructed a new hospital in Brooklyn and plan additional hospitals for Manhattan and Nassau County, NY.

I was recently named one of the “I 00 great things about New York” by Jack Newfield of The New York Post. I tell you this not to speak of myself, but certainly there is no doubt that Gil Alba should be one of the 100 great things about New York City and now even more so nationally, a treasure.

Working in the healthcare field frequently it becomes necessary for me to seek professional help regarding issues concerning safety within the hospital system. I could always call upon Gill who responded with integrity, dedication, and most importantly, compassion in a field known for directness and indifference.

When there was the threat of terrorism, he brought together experts both from within the police department and the FBI to assist with developing programs which encouraged and provided safety and response mechanisms.

Gil assisted and arranged for loved ones who were incarcerated to visit their family member who was suffering from advanced cancer.

Gil is highly regarded by former colleagues in the Major Case Unit of the New York City Police Department. He frequently assisted tem1inal cancer victims by coordinating police officers to assist in facilitating in ambulance service and other compassionate needs of our patients.

This man, who brings together competence and cnom1ous empathy for both victims and those members surrounding these unfortunate events, is a credit to Jaw enforcement professionalism and police investigation.

Despite growing up Puerto Rican in a time in which he experienced extreme prejudice, he implemented his pain and became a protector of those who hated and revi led him because of his birth. He became the best that Jaw enforcement could produce.

I unreservedly recommend to honor Mr. Gil Alba for any recognition possible, especially from his peers.

Mireille Mireille.Marius@equipement.gouv.fr

“I am French and my daughter disappeared in the USA, so I had the occasion to meet Gil Alba during my researches to N.Y. I appreciated to meet Mr Alba who gave evidence of a big courtesy and made the maximun to help and stimulate me with a lot of tact and kindness, Gil Alba listened because I have never given him money.

In this painful matter I feel stimulated by the idea to have an honest person like Gil on the American ground.”

Tom Fitzgibbon NYPD Detective

My name is Tom Fitzgibbon and I joined the NYPD in 1962, as a police officer, in an era when The Police Department was trying to change its image to that of a more caring, open and accountable Department. In the early seventies, I was assigned to an investigative unit where I met and worked with Gil Alba for most of that decade.

I was able to witness first hand his respectful treatment of everyone he encountered during the course of an investigation as well as his thoroughness and his ability to get right to the crux of the matter, weeding out extraneous information that might well lead a less gifted investigator down a series of dead ends.

Although I retired from the NYPD in the mid eighties and moved to Florida, I still communicate with Gil and consider him a lifelong friend. I remember Gil, not for any specific case, but rather for the conscientious manner with which he approached and handled everyone of the hundreds, if not thousands of cases he handled when we worked together.

James R. Buckley Buckley Petersen Global

I have spent more than 30 years in law enforcement, assigned to the Major Case Squad and became the commander of the Criminal Investigations Division. Having worked every imaginable type case, I am completely familiar with conducting a thorough and proper criminal investigation, one that will lead to a successful prosecution.

Mr. Alba is a credit to law enforcement. He rose through the ranks of the NYPD’s Detective Division to become a First Grade Detective. He was in fact a “first grade detective.” In the private sector, Mr. Alba continues to excell at his profession. His case solving abilities are admirable. Gil truly knows how to conduct thorough and complex investigations and to see them through to the end with a successful conclusion.

When you think of Gil Alba, you are reminded of qualities such as dedication, honesty and integrity, dependability, and a never quit attitude. Gil is the epitome of a quality individual who still cares about victims and all of society. He did not become jaundiced as a result of his career.

I personally salute and congratulate Gil for his accomplishments both in and out of law enforcement and as a private detective. He really deserves the title, “Detective of the Year.”

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